February 28, 2021

"You Are Worthy" - Brad Yates


Life and EFT Insights by Brad Yates

Credit: Brad Yates

Brad, Welcome to Kreative Circle! At what point in your life were you introduced to Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT)? What were your initial thoughts of EFT?

After moving to Northern California in 2000, having shifted from a career in acting to a practice as a clinical hypnotherapist, I was introduced to the field of Energy Psychology, and was encouraged to attend a conference where I could learn EFT from it’s founder, Gary Craig. While many people are put off at first by the, shall we say, strangeness of tapping on one’s face, it wasn’t that weird for me, given that I had attended Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Clown College. I found it interesting. When we tapped on chocolate cravings, and my desire for a piece of chocolate went from an 8 out of 10 to a zero in a matter of minutes, I knew there was something to this technique.

Is there such a thing as emotional freedom since humans are constantly swimming within their emotions?

I suppose that the most practiced Zen master might approach a level of total emotional freedom, but the rest of us are on a spectrum from total freedom to no freedom at all. It is certainly possible to move up that scale to greater levels of freedom than most people experience. Emotional freedom is the freedom to make better choices, so the more we are able to break free from the control emotions may have had over us in the past, the more we can improve our lives.

You're an EFT professional whose career history anchors back to acting. What acting skills have transferred into your EFT career?

Where I’ve had my greatest success is with my videos on YouTube. My time as an actor definitely prepared me for this platform, as I’m very comfortable performing in front of the camera. My years of stage performing also made it much easier to present in front of a live audience. People find this work much more accessible when it is entertaining.

What are the top three reasons why people seek EFT healing services? 

There’s an expression in EFT: “Try it on everything!” People around the world are using EFT to facilitate change in numerous areas of life – personal, professional, financial, physical. Based on which of my videos are getting the most views, the number one issue that people turn to EFT for is anxiety. The next would be other emotional pain, such as dealing with a break-up or other upsetting circumstances. The other subject that is always somewhere at the top of the list is clearing the blocks to having more money, and greater success in general. At its most basic, tapping reduces stress, which either causes or at least worsens most if not all of the issues that trouble us. Tapping through the stress allows us to feel better, which allows us to do better, which allows us to live better.

Brad, often in your videos you touch upon the words 'resistance', 'healing', and 'acceptance'. How do you define these words?

Resistance – Resistance is that force that stops us from making the positive choices and taking the positive actions that we know would lead to the circumstances we desire. It’s self-sabotage, but it comes from a loving intention to protect us from something we have been led to believe would be harmful to us in some way, even though that may seem illogical. This programming is most often based on misunderstandings – ours or someone else’s – but the longer we’ve bought into it, the stronger the resistance is likely to be. For example, if we’ve been taught that “money is the root of all evil,” our subconscious mind will resist opportunities to make more money, because it is protecting us from being evil. We will sabotage possible relationships if we’ve learned that people tend to hurt us, and we understandably want to resist that.

Healing – This is the process of letting go what no longer serves us so that we experience greater freedom and well-being, physically as well as emotionally. It is a return to who we really are – this unique expression of light and love.

Acceptance – Many people find acceptance a challenging concept, because we often mistake it for approval. Acceptance isn’t saying that things which cause us pain in our life are okay. But rather an acknowledgment that they are there. Too often we fight the idea of what is there, which makes it difficult if not impossible to resolve issues. If your dog poops on your carpet, you need to accept the truth that it is there in order to clean it up.

How has EFT nurtured your self-development? What aspect of your emotional & physical growth has EFT had a monumental effect?

Even though I was an actor, and it seems illogical, I believe I had a big fear of being seen – at least at a certain level. So I stopped myself from doing things that could have led to greater success, because that felt dangerous. I wasn’t consciously aware of this fear – I was sure I wanted to be wildly successful. But my actions – or more often lack of action – would contradict that. As I’ve tapped over the years, I’ve cleared away more and more of this fear, and allowed myself greater levels of success. I’ve also become much more comfortable in my skin, and experience much more self-love, which allows me to be more loving towards others.

What inspires you to create EFT scripts to nurture your YouTube channel that hosts at least 172,000 subscribers?

I get my inspiration from all kinds of places. Sometimes it’s from hearing what people are going through. Sometimes it’s from listening to a podcast, reading a book or hearing an inspirational presentation, and having the thought, “That concept would make a great tapping round! People could benefit from this idea, and tapping will help them have the freedom to hear it more profoundly!” And a lot of my videos come from things I know I could benefit from tapping on.

While EFT is inspired by Chinese therapies, can EFT modalities be applied on pets?

There are a number of practitioners who actually specialize in working with pets. It can be a little trickier doing the tapping on animals – and many do it in a surrogate way. But there are plenty of people who swear by energy work with their pets.

Healing is a unique process for each individual. What is the common time frame for people to start experiencing shifts in their reality?

While big shifts can often occur quickly with EFT, it is hard to predict specific outcomes. It would be like asking what is the common time frame for people to reach their goal weight. It depends on a number of factors, including where they are starting from. But we generally see at least some reduction in distress pretty quickly with tapping – a certain amount of relaxation that happens after even a short round.

What is the most valuable lesson EFT has taught you in your life?

I’ve learned how amazing people are. I’ve always loved the work of Michelangelo – especially the David. Michelangelo said that the statues were already there, perfectly whole and complete, and he just needed to chip away what didn’t belong in order to reveal the masterpiece inside. I’ve found that’s the case with humans – and we are just tapping away what no longer belongs.

You're also an author who has written The Wizard's Wish and The Key to Success. What inspired you to write The Wizard's Wish?

When I was being filmed for the documentary “The Tapping Solution,” the conversation turned to children, and I spoke of how there’s greatness in each child, and if we could use EFT with them to clear misunderstandings and upsets early on they would have greater freedom to live better lives. Nearly all of the blocks my clients are facing stem from some childhood incident. So I wanted to find a fun storybook way to introduce EFT to kids. A friend had called me “the EFT Wizard,” and I love wizard things – I have a collection of Harry Potter wands. It seemed a perfect way to share this idea with kids and the adults who love them.

Brad, when you're not educating and healing other people, how do you entertain and nourish your inner child?

Actually, tapping with people is what most nourishes me, and it’s where I have the most fun. But I also love movies, traveling, and playing the saxophone. (Not well, mind you, but well enough to garner some enjoyment from it.)

What life curiosity are you trying to decipher in the recent years? Is there anything that keeps you up at night?

How to make a tapping video go viral…! I know how amazingly valuable this work can be, but there’s still a lot of resistance to it out there. I’m always hoping I’ll be struck with an idea that will make this work even more accessible, such that it spreads like wildfire.

Please share with audiences where they can support your work.

The best place to start is at www.tapwithbrad.com. There they will find more information about EFT/Tapping as well as links to the various resources I have to offer.

February 26, 2021

Spirituality & Benefits of Theta Healing

 Meet Chelsea Henderson, Entrepreneur and Theta Healing Practitioner

Credit: Chelsea Henderson

When asked what she wanted to be when she grew up at he age of five, Chelsea’s response was “A Healer”. Since childhood she was an Empath and highly intuitive. Always picking up on the energy and emotions of others was simply a lot of stimuli, and overwhelming at times. As she grew into her teenage years she realized this was not a curse, but a gift. She then learned to use these gifts to motivate, empower, emotionally heal, and intuitively offer words and advice that would provide solutions to other’s problems in life. After studying psychology, pre-med, and realizing neither fields were what she aligned with at the core of her being she began a normal corporate job. It wasn’t until she realized it was not the effort, education, intellectual abilities, or any of that alone bringing her the results she wanted. It was a state of being that she was tapped into at all times, sometimes referred to as the state of “Flow”. After much research on everything from science to spirituality to behaviors and qualities of “The Greats” in history, she discovered a multitude of healing modalities. Now Chelsea practices these techniques to heal, enhance performance in, and mentor other. Chelsea lives with the mission of raising human consciousness and expanding awareness of the true human potential that lives within us all. Credit: Chelsea Henderson's Site


February 24, 2021

Meet Chelsea Henderson, Healing Practitioner

Credit: Chelsea Henderson

Welcome Chelsea! As a spiritual entrepreneur, how were you initially introduced to spirituality and what role does it play in your life?

I wouldn’t say I was even “spiritual” when introduced to spirituality. I was  too young to understand the concept. I’ve been an Intuitive and Empath  since I was about 5 years-old, and was very energetically sensitive. I picked  up on the energies of those around me in an almost debilitating way. As a  child I was a mute; wouldn’t speak a word to anyone but my mother and  father. My siblings, extended family, school teachers, etc. couldn’t pay me  to speak. Always picking up on the energy and emotions of others was a lot of stimuli, and just overwhelmed me. Crowded places like grocery stores and shopping malls made for a rough trip. It was before I was able to discern between my own emotions and vibrational frequency to what I was picking up on from others. it’d just come in as one heaping pile of discordant information. Since our energy fields are etheric in nature, I think these experiences were my introduction to spirituality and the higher realms we express ourselves in non physically.

Spirituality now plays an integral role in my life, my work, and how I co-create my human experience. As an intuitive healer, life coach, spiritual teacher, and Channeler, my work can’t be done without this collaborative, co-creative effort between spirit and our 3D physical reality. The higher vibrational frequencies of the realms giving me the information must be tapped into from where I stand physically focused into form. It’s all co-creative. 

How would you describe spirituality to someone who perceives it to be a foreign concept?

**We would ask them what their definition of “foreign” is. If they agreed with the general concept that something “foreign” is of an unfamiliar form, different of one’s own- we would say spirituality can never be a foreign concept. It has never been. The essence of who you are, at the core of your being, after every part of your physical structure is stripped away is spirit. Thought forms don’t need a physical structure to exist, that’s just how they enter our physical brain from a universal conscious network. Thoughts are then spiritual. Pure Unconditional love is not only the strongest unifying force on the planet, it’s the frequency of the creator of all that is. God is literally love, both of which are spiritual in nature. Anything that exists but is non physically focused is considered spirituality. Quantum physics, metaphysics, energy, consciousness- it’s all spirituality. **

** = Spiritually channeled response hence the 'we' pronoun referencing Spirit.
Chelsea, your work focuses on Theta Healing. What is theta healing and how does it differ from other healing modalities that encompass energy and distance?

The ThetaHealing® technique is a meditation technique and spiritual philosophy – not specific to one religion but accepting them all – with the purpose of getting closer to the Creator. It is a training method for your mind, body, and spirit that allows you to clear limiting beliefs and live life with positive thoughts, developing virtues in all that we do. Through meditation and prayer, the ThetaHealing® Technique creates a positive lifestyle.

The ThetaHealing® technique is always taught to be used in conjunction with conventional medicine. It teaches how to put to use one’s own natural intuition, relying upon unconditional love of the Creator Of All That Is to do the actual “work.” We believe by changing your brain wave cycle to include the “Theta” state, you can actually watch the Creator Of All That Is create instantaneous physical and emotional well-being. We have learned that through the ThetaHealing® Technique intuitive abilities can be used to bring about spontaneous physical and emotional well-being.

I was attracted to Thetahealing® because the modality combines energy healing, intuitive medicine, and science into one practice. At age 5 I knew I wanted to be a healer and I had to take a lot of wrong paths before finding out what being a healer meant for me. I studied pre-med, but it was too spiritually restricting. I studied psychology which felt better, but still wasn’t the best form of expression for my intuitive abilities. When I found Thetahealing® I felt like I found somewhere I could fit. It was a happy marriage between science and spirituality, which makes for a very effective holistic method of healing. Thus it was the first modality I became certified to practice. Over time it has opened me up to abilities and gifts I never knew I had, and do things I never thought to be humanly possible. 

What forms of healing have been effective in your personal and spiritual growth?

Belief work. Sometimes the only thing holding us back from healing or living the life of our dreams are our negative and limiting beliefs. It’s the old programs we’ve been running, some since childhood, that are no longer serving us to hold onto. If you hold on long enough they will manifest as physical illnesses as well. Clearing limited beliefs, old programs, and patterns was the hardest part for me but the most beneficial. It’s something I practice on myself and my clients in healing sessions. 

If you had a magic wand, what would you like to change (or improve) pertaining the modes of healing that exist within the earth realm?

**If we had a magic wand and could change anything right here right now, we would get rid of old broken systems and create new conscious systems. I.e. educational systems, entertainment and music industries, financial and political systems, institutions etc. We would wave the wand and transform everyone working in these systems into heart centered and conscious beings, serving the highest good of everyone involved in and affected by their actions. 

You didn’t say how many changes, so we would also transform earth and those who inhabit into a symbiotic species and planet. It would be a planet of beings denoting a mutually beneficial relationship between different people, groups, systems and species’ throughout all levels of existence on earth. Thus throughout all levels of existence universally, because as you ascend so does the rest of existence. Ideally everyone would work together to ensure survival, well being, and further evolution on a collective level. There’s no I in team. The more people wake up from the illusion of separation, realizing that we are all connected as one, they will come to realize that this is the key to ensuring their survival, their neighbors, and the world’s.**

** = Spiritually channeled response hence the 'we' pronoun referencing Spirit.

As a healing practitioner and life coach, what have you learned about human beings and their quest for goal actualization? Are there any common themes present among the clients you serve?

Goals…… I’ve never been a fan of them. The common theme present when I’d use systems to track where me or my clients were in relationship to our goals, was that we all left feeling like failures when we didn’t achieve them. I practice the same methods I give my clients so I’ve experienced the repeated feeling of defeat and unworthiness as well. I don’t care how outrageous/unrealistic the goals may have been. Walking away having not achieved them just re-enforced the feeling and re-ran the program that we weren’t good enough. So we stopped working on goals and started working on Alchemy. 

As a Pisces and someone that's studied psychology, metaphysics, mysticism and the like in depth, I’m a combination of a “magician” energy as known by tarot, and a master manifester. I love it, and it’s what I enjoy doing in my own life and teaching to others. I teach (what I think is) a simple method to create something from nothing instead of chasing and reaching from a state of misalignment from where you prefer to be. The first thing I think when I hear “goal” is the fact that I haven’t reached where I’m trying to go. You can’t get there from a state of lack or limitation, which is where you always start when you set a goal. 

Chelsea, you also host workshops where you channel messages. Can you please share how channeling works? Are there any messages you've received that have surprised you during these live experiences?

Channeling kind of works like a radio. My guides will broadcast information on a certain “radio station” and my brain works as the receiver. So when I tune my brainwave state and vibrational frequency to theirs and they tune their frequency to mine- a moment happens where we meet in the middle and link. My brain, the receiver, can then receive the information they’re sending out in the form of downloads. The downloads go through the language center of my brain and convert the information into our human language, in the way that’s best representative of the concepts. That’s how my guides have explained it to me. 

I can choose my active level of involvement in the process. If I want to completely take the back seat and let them drive, I can. I don’t have to actively listen to what they’re saying. My consciousness could be in a far away corner taking a nap, and when I come back the interaction is over. On the other end I could be fully involved, listen, participate and speak on behalf of my guides. I just want everyone to clearly understand my level of free will, because channeling is never forced or imposed upon me. I invoke it. The strangest thing that’s happened when channeling was just in front of a few people, but I received information in a different language and had to Google it. Thankfully it didn’t hurt my credibility because the message made complete sense. It just opened my mind up to a moment of “Okay, so that’s something that can happen. Good to know.” 

As an avid advocate of the arts, you also write and produce music. What genre of music do you enjoy listening to?

No one ever likes my response to this question, but I actually don’t listen to much music. As a highly creative person I have to be careful of what I feed my mind, so as not to recreate it in my music or reality. That’s the bigness of the innate capability we all have. So I try to limit my exposure to external influences that don’t resonate with me on a soul level. By feeding my soul instead of my mind I found that the music I’d write and produce was always unique, and an authentic expression of who I am. I create the music of my soul, and when I find other people that forge their own path in that way I enjoy listening to their music too. 

What genre of music do you produce to support your creative and spiritual calling?

This kind of relates to my previous response. I’ve been writing music since I was 9. In my teen years of writing for other people I would just write lyrics to fit the form they wanted it to fit. A lot of it was rap and hip hop focused. As a teenager I found it cool and fun to express a gritty aspect of myself through the artists. As I evolved spirituality I found it harder and increasingly less satisfying to write things that weren’t in alignment with who I was. The more you live your truth and stand in your own power, the more uncomfortable it gets to wear a mask. I started producing because it gave me complete creative freedom. 

I spent 10 hours a day for 3 days in my friends studio learning how to make music. I played every sound from scratch, no samples, exactly the way I heard it in my mind. I had never played instruments before, but when my hands hit the synthesizer keyboard I knew what to do. I just closed my eyes and played. Being freed from the creative constraints of staying in a certain lane allowed me to channel my music, and tap into my creative abilities as a producer and songwriter.

I’ve made my own meditation music recently that supports both callings. I’ve also written some songs that just felt good to write. I don't know what I’ll do with them right now which is fine. I wrote them simply for the joy it brought me to do so. It supports my creative and spiritual calling by keeping me in alignment with my highest self. I do have an affinity for certain sounds and instruments. I’ve also noticed an etheric quality that’s pretty consistent throughout my music. I’m drawn to the violin, piano, harp, cello, acoustic guitar, and symphonic sounds.

Is there a ritual or process you emulate to write your music? When do you know you've completed writing an entire piece of music?

I’ve changed the way I initiate writing songs. I used to make the decision to start writing the song based on when I felt I had to have it done by. I would find myself unable to find words or establish a flow. It left me to reach for the material and extract the words from my brain, instead of allowing them to flow from my soul. It was very counter intuitive. Now I start with managing the state I’m in. If I’m properly aligned I’ll just start hearing lyrics in my head and have to rush to my phone or grab a pen and paper. Sometimes I’ll get them in a dream and write them when I wake up. The song doesn’t go away until it’s written though. I usually find myself free writing it in one sitting. Then I’ll structure and rewrite it in another. That’s basically the extent of the process. 

What is the secret to writing music that will be entertained by the media, music, TV and healing industry?

The secret is to not. When you write or create something that’s an authentic expression of you and your truth, the right people will find resonance with it. Just don’t lose sight of what you’re doing it for, and let go of attachment to any particular outcome. Don’t pay attention to the 100 people that don’t find resonance, focus on the 5 that do. Those are your people, you woke them up, they’ll wake up others, and what’s entertained by those industries will change. 

Chelsea, you represent a few roles in your life from a spiritual practitioner to an entrepreneur. Which role among many (healing practitioner, entrepreneur, writer, musician; etc.) came first?

Writing definitely came first. I started writing music lyrics and poetry when I was nine years-old. I barely spoke so that’s how I was able to express myself. I wrote my first children’s book in 4th grade (around the same age), my dad illustrated it, and my teacher published it. At that age nothing is really a role though, it’s a skill or hobby.

What is the best advice you've received as a healing practitioner?

I was usually rejected by a lot of the people I would ask for advice. Which was good because it was my journey to experience and my path to pave. The answers to my questions were revealed to me in the form of lessons and life experiences. Life has always been my best teacher. 

What is the most useful advice you'd offer to a spiritual practitioner in training?

Work from the inside out. Align within first, then act in the world. That way you’ll encounter the path of least resistance and your inner guidance will be loud and clear. 

When producing healing music, what are the essential variables which permit the music to have a healing effect on listeners?

There are healing frequencies that when synchronized with your brainwaves, they create a destress response within the body. For example 963 Hz, 852 Hz, or 741 Hz. There’s also sound healing instruments like crystal singing bowls. A soft, rhythmic, soothing tone of voice of any mantras or vocals also helps. 

Chelsea, one of your aspirations including directing a TV series. What type of artistic genre would you like to direct? Do you also have any desire to act in these TV series?

Sci-Fi, Drama, Fiction, Adventure, Mystery, Fantasy- I’m open to creating anything I’m inspired by. I don’t have a desire to act in them, but that’s not to say I’ll always feel that way. Who knows?

If you could have directed a TV series that existed in the past decade, do you have a favorite show where you'd love to see your name in the credits?

I feel like the best is yet to be created. 

As an artist and healer, you are also writing a book. What is one important thing you would like all future readers to know about you through your writings?

It is my passion, pleasure, and purpose to bring through the information that I do. Me and my guides appreciate the opportunity to share our perspective with them.

You are a talented professional representing a wide array of the creative arts. By any chance, do you tell or know any good jokes? :)

Relationships are like toots. If you have to force it, it’s probably poop. :)

Please share with audiences how they can support your work.

Chelsea @ Theta Healing Here
Chelsea Henderson @ Squarespace Here

February 21, 2021

Meet Keith Hoffert - Storyteller, Producer and Chef

Credit: Keith Hoffert
Storyteller, Producer, Chef, Speaker & Entrepreneur


Welcome! Keith, as a chef, how important is it for you to build relationships with patrons that benefit from your culinary skills?
I think it's very important you know in this day and age you're trading time for attention. Your relationship, your product quality and your brand is what keeps them coming back. You know people are always looking for something to relate to one another. I think that's human nature, we want to find commonality among us because it helps us deal with life in general but also creates that experience that forever holds somebody's attention as a memory, or as an experience in their life that they don't forget. They want others to share in the experience as well. These are the types of relationships that you want to build with your patrons. You want them to leave there knowing this is the only place that they can get this experience - it's unique, it's tailored, it's genuine and it's something that is worth my attention that is worth me taking my time from somewhere else and dedicating it towards this experience. You have to be real, there has to be a face to the name of the brand, there has to be something for them to relate to and give you their attention for beyond just a product.

What is the best compliment that you've received as a chef?

This one is easy…a clean plate. When someone finishes their meal and there's nothing left on that plate then I know they enjoyed it and that makes me happy and I smile. It’s a compliment every Chef wants! 

What is the best constructive guidance you've received during your 26 year career as a chef?

Learning how to not react, not give your power away and also how to be flexible like a bamboo in the wind because without those two things you are bound to get your emotions wrapped up with all kinds of misdirection. If you're not flexible, you'll sink that ship before you even get started. 

What is the secret behind executing a wide range of culinary cuisine on a fixed budget? What are the do's and don'ts when working with such constraints?

I would say the best secret I can give you is learn how to do cross utilization. Learn how to use the same ingredient in multiple dishes and learn how to source locally. You’re probably going to get a better price from the local guide down the street who's got probably fresher ingredients than you are at any major chain where they have to cover cost for labor and transportation and all the other things that come with doing commerce, whereas the gentleman down the road who you know has a small farmer's backyard with probably the best tomatoes on the side of the highway that I've ever tasted. You'll be supporting small business which is always a good thing. The second best secret I can give you is to learn your cooking techniques with the proper cooking tips. You can use less expensive cuts of meat in less expensive ingredients and still get a great flavor profile or you know how to properly season that less expensive ingredient and that in turn will lead to an easier time with the budget.

As a foodie, what are the following...

Your favorite meal of the day? What is it?

Midnight Snack- Peanut butter & jelly with tall glass of cold milk!

A favorite dish you can cook with your eyes closed?

OK, this is gonna seem kind of funny coming from a chef but I love Ramen noodles and I love all the ways that you can make them with all the cool ingredients that you can put with them and you can take a noodle bowl and turn it into 500 different ways to have a noodle bowl. It is one of my most favorite dishes. I ate it growing up as a young kid. I used it during college because I was on a tight budget, it was just one of those things that you could always add something else to it and it was never the same dish choice so I would absolutely love it.

Do you have a favorite vegetable?

Brussels sprouts with bacon and onions.

Is there a fruit that is tasty yet requires high precision to integrate in your cooking?

​You know not anyone in particular but usually when you start introducing fruit into the culinary world it should be pretty well thought out in the sense of the flavor profiles and how they're going to blend with each other.

What is one dish that you believe everyone should know how to cook?

​Spaghetti and meatballs with a good tomato sauce or as we call it in the Italian world 'gravy'.

What is one ingredient that you use a lot in your cooking?

LOVE!!!

What is one ingredient that you should use more in your cooking but you don't?

Homemade stocks are so affordable. You just need to take the time to make them.  I just don't have the time but I do miss them a lot.

If you had to describe the colors on your dinner plate, what would they be?

I would say bright reds and greens and yellows. You know usually the brighter the dish, the fresher it is at least that's what my eyes always tell me. Usually bright yellows, reds, greens and purples - these colors are the things that signify more fresh than not.

What is the most difficult recipe you've had to prepare? 

I don't do very well with the patience of baking so usually anything that acquires intense baking gives me trouble.
 
If you had to forego appetizers or a dessert, which one would you pass?

​Appetizer!! Because again, I don’t do well making my own desserts. It’s why the pastry chef is so important.

Your last meal would be?

​ONE I DIDN’T HAVE TO COOK…..LOL!!

As an entrepreneur who founded and managed EightFifty:Media, what were the top two lessons you learned about the media landscape in your initial year of conducting business? Is there anything you would've done differently? 

That change is the only constant and attention is the only real currency. I think if I had to go back and do anything different, I think it would be probably more focused on just a few of the services we offered - the ones we were really good at - just go all in and double down on those and let others who are good at the other stuff do the other stuff. It's very easy to get yourself spread too thin trying to chase the dollar especially as an entrepreneur when you need every dollar you can get. Sometimes that can cause people to get out of their lane and maybe take on something that they aren't as good at or which doesn't really represent the foundation of the company that they are building, or the services that they offer. I know when we first started with 850 in the digital marketing space we were doing all things for all people and it ended up spreading us way too thin and it was about 8 or 9 months in before we realized that we probably had about four things that we did ‘really really really’ well. If we just focused on those strengths that could be the bread and butter, everything else we get outsourced to those that could do it better than us. Now that's a successful formula right there!

Storytelling is an art. Is there a story from your childhood that you remember to this day?

So this one day I got a brand new pair of roller blades and was at my grandparent’s house. They had this huge hill out in front of their house that had this really steep curve on it and I just thought it was going to be the coolest thing to come flying down the hill and make this cool you know lean into the curve like they do on the TV where you put your hand down and kind of drag it on the ground and stuff. Well I went for it full on probably about 30 miles an hour coming down the hill and I got a rock stuck between the back wheel in the break and I didn't have my shirt on and I just scraped it. It absolutely screwed up my whole back of my body and my side from my head to my toe and you know here's where my generation always can kind of find something to relate to - we always had the grandparents that never just had hydrogen peroxide or just would put neosporin on it. It was always alcohol and iodine. I don't know if you understands what that means, or if you are making the same face I am right now just thinking about it, but if you've ever put iodine or alcohol on a cut it doesn't feel good and if you can imagine from my head to my toe scrapes - huge scrapes - from hitting the asphalt, covered in iodine and alcohol I was in so much pain I almost never rollerbladed again. 

Keith, in your opinion, where do you believe people can do a better job with storytelling?

You know I think one of the best pieces of advice that was ever given to me about public speaking or telling your story was stay in your lane and talk about what you know because those are the things that you can relate to and those are the things you can translate the emotion, you can set the scene and you can really sort of put the crowd or the audience there because you've experienced it. It's what you know, you should be able to describe it a lot better than say something that you don't know.

Given all the media and social sharing platforms, if you had to only rely on one source to share your professional craft, what source/platform would it be?

I think the value of word of mouth is still the most underrated advertising that's out there if I had to go for one of them that's the one I would choose.

As the founder of FoodieLife, what are a few qualities of a devoted foodie? How would you immediately recognize an impostor foodie?
 
Oh I think you can tell a real foodie by the excitement that you hear in their voice or see the expressions on their face when you start talking about food. Sometimes it's the simple stuff like just talking about peanut butter and jelly. What kind of bread to put it on, what kind of jelly to get and how thick, how much crunch is there, and whether is it smooth. You start really getting the feel for how much somebody enjoys food when you listen to them talk about it. 

Keith, you were a co-creator on GrubOn TV and You Say Tomato. You Say Tomato takes the audience on a journey of discovery that celebrates the best of British and American cuisines. What did you learn about British cuisine and dining when working with your co-presenter David Gillespie?

I think the biggest thing that I learned with David and Mark and the crew of GrubOn TV and You Say Tomato, was that we may have different names for the ingredients but most of the things are pretty common. We drink champagne to celebrate, we eat roast for Christmas, we like ice cream. It's a ballpark you know, it's these experiences that food creates for us that are the same across the board no matter what language or what country you’re from. While growing up, I found that very very fascinating and I don't think that we really understand enough sometimes that food really is a huge vehicle for humanity to make many things happen especially when it comes down to the fundamental ability to relate to another human being and find something in common with that person across the table from you.

Is there anything American chefs and restaurateurs can learn from the British culture?

Day drinking. Laughing out loud, seriously it's a skill, an acquired skill that I don't have but the British could teach you that's for sure. In all seriousness I think one of the things that I really enjoyed about Dave and Mark and seeing the British side of food was entrenched in their roots there. Their relationship to the memories in the taste experiences that came from the dishes that their parents made passed on from their grandparents made sure they had growing up are a really fundamental part of the cooking over there. I think the regional exploitation of what is available to you at that point in time is what you cook was a really neat thing and a great concept.  

While you're busy as a chef, entrepreneur, producer and storyteller, how do you keep yourself grounded day to day?

Transcendental meditation at least 1x a day but I like to do it 2x to keep me grounded and thinking clearly.

Do you have a morning ritual? How do you set the tone for the day?

My goal every morning is to strive to have at least an hour and a half to two hours to myself. I've always subscribed to if you can't put time for yourself aside each day then how are you going to expect to put time aside for anybody else. My morning routine consists of usually some good reading, a paragraph or two of something spiritual or enlightening, then some transcendental meditation followed by some coffee and just sort of a slow breakfast. Throughout the years, my mornings were very fast and I have learned that slower mornings make me way better prepared for the day so that is what I strive to do.

Is there a book from the business, artistic or spiritual genre that you recommend audiences to read?

There are actually three books that I would suggest you read on just knowing business better as well as artistic and all spiritual. I think all three of those books fit in with these genres. The first one is the Four Agreements, which I think is just a fantastic book. The second one is A Course In Miracles which is a real good mind twist about how the ego really just needs to calm down. The last but not least I read a chapter of the TAO every morning and I think it's just a great way to keep yourself grounded. It's a good way to look at the energy that is everything, whatever you want to call it and I don't even think you have to be Buddhist for the TAO to mean something. Those are three books that every morning I try to read a piece of every morning.

Please share with audiences with how they can support your work.

Pensacola Business Radio @ Instagram
FoodieLife @ Instagram   |  FoodieLife @ Facebook | ​ Keith Hoffert Website

Credit: FoodieLive


February 19, 2021

Sasha's Book Pick: Called to Create

 

Credit: Called to Create
By Author Jordan Raynor


Book Preview
We were created by an infinitely creative God to reflect his love and character to the world. One way we do that is by continuing his creative work. In this energizing book, serial entrepreneur and bestselling author Jordan Raynor helps artists, entrepreneurs, writers, and other creatives reimagine our work as service to God and others, addressing such penetrating questions as

- Is my work as a creative really as God-honoring as that of a pastor or missionary?
- What does it look like to create not to make a name for myself but to glorify God and serve others?
- How can I use my work to fulfill Jesus's command to create disciples?
- Will what I make today matter in eternity?

Author Profile

Jordan Raynor is a serial entrepreneur and national bestselling author who helps Christians do their most exceptional work for the glory of God and the good of others. Through his books, podcast, and weekly devotionals, Jordan has helped millions of Christians in every single country connect the gospel to their work. In addition to producing this content Jordan serves as the Executive Chairman of Threshold 360, a venture-backed tech startup that has built the world's largest library of 360° experiences of hotels, restaurants, and attractions. Jordan previously served as CEO of the company, following a string of successful ventures of his own. (Credit: Bio Profile, Amazon)

February 17, 2021

Exploring the Foodie Lifestyle

 

Credit: Sasha Talks | Keith Hoffert

(Please excuse the minor noises in the background since Chef Hoffert was reporting live from the kitchen.)


Say Hello to Keith Hoffert
Executive Chef, Entrepreneur, Storyteller and Producer

Pensacola Business Radio @ Instagram
​FoodieLife @ Instagram
​FoodieLife @ Facebook
​Keith Hoffert's Website

February 16, 2021

Mistress of the Rock by Myron Edwards

Credit: Myron Edwards

Myron, Welcome to Kreative Circle! Your childhood traces back to England where you completed your academia prior to pursuing a career in the travel industry. What type of arts and literature were you introduced to while growing up?

Thank you Sasha for the opportunity to be on Kreative Circle. My first steps into creativity was as a very young lad, probably about six or seven. We were asked to design clothes for a doll or toy figure. I produced a Scottish soldier complete with kilt and boots. My teachers were so impressed they asked the local school inspector to view my work. I got top marks for that. But shortly after my results began to fall off. One morning we had an eye test and I was found to be as blind as a bat, I couldn’t tell the figure of a dog from that of a cow, I was diagnosed short sighted and needed glasses. When I moved to secondary school my education was not too good, I only did well in English, Drama and Economics, I was bad at Maths and Geography, so how I became a travel agent is beyond me. 

How did working in the travel and airline industry influence your life outlook and creativity while nurturing your growth?

When I started in travel, I worked first as a Saturday boy stamping brochures, selling Insurance policies and theater tickets. After I finished school I had a permanent job in the agency. I stayed for a couple of years before branching out to work in London. On my commutes I would often put pen to paper and write a few lines, not really thinking about doing anything with them. Of course travel broadens the mind so whilst working in airlines and tour operations I would come into contact with organisations who had various degrees of travel requirements, some of these were straightforward A-B requests, but on occasions others would be more elaborate, like a twelve or fifteen stage itinerary complete with a program of events. This would require me to create a program for the participants along the lines of a conference or incentive program. To win the business particularly in Incentive travel you had to be creative as this was very lucrative. During my travel career I organised conferences and incentives in Hong Kong, Portugal, Spain, and incentive groups in the Far East, Australia as well as the States.

In the mid 1970's you started working as a freelancer for BBC radio and television. How were you introduced to the BBC organization? What did you learn at BBC which helped you refine the art of writing and storytelling?

I fell into writing for the BBC, as prior to this I was a drummer in a pop rock band, the lead guitarist and singer is a guy called Phil Campbell, who had previously worked as a runner for Hammer Films, the makers of numerous horror films, starring the likes of Christopher Lee, Peter Cushing and Vincent Price to name but a few. So Phil suggested we get together as he had a friend who needed some scripts for a hospital radio program. We produced the scripts and were left with a plethora of material which Phil sent to the BBC. One of those jokes got selected by ‘The Two Ronnie’s’ who at the time were probably the leading comedy duo on TV and we had our material on their Christmas show. Once bitten by the comedy bug, we looked around for more places to approach, we chose ‘Hudd Lines’ which starred and was performed by the late Roy Hudd, the Producer was John Lloyd MBE, who is also the Producer of ‘Not the Nine O Clock News’ and Black Adder as well as many other comedy shows. Now we were in the BBC, all be it on the fringe, we wrote for a satirical show called ‘Week Ending’ starring David Jason who went on to become ’Dell Boy’ in Only Fools and Horses. Some of the Producers on ‘Week Ending’ became household names like Gryth Rhys Jones and the late Douglas Adams of ‘Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy.’ I also started to try some one off scripts and was picked up by BBC Scotland who produced a show called ‘A kick up the 80’s’ with Tracey Ullman. Phil was writing for Dick Emery by then. All these people in many ways contributed to my education in writing, I don’t think I would have written much had it not been for this experience.

Your credits at BBC radio and television include The Two Ronnie’s, Week Endings, and The News Huddlines.
What was the most challenging assignment you had at BBC and why?
What did you learn from this opportunity?
What advice do you have for writers seeking opportunities in the news and media broadcasting field?

The most challenging aspect was without doubt getting into the BBC. ‘The Beeb’ as it is affectionately known is like an inner sanctum, you have to work at it to be accepted, you have to constantly churn out material and that material needs to be good. The standard of writing is exceptional. So to be involved in the creative process was an achievement in its own right. The doyens of script writing all began at the BBC, producing some of the best writers in that genre over and over again. One guy who stands out is a chap called Andy Hamilton who is a genius of comedy, if you were to look through his CV he has credits in every major production the BBC produced since the 70’s. What did I learn probably the most important lesson in life whether it is writing or something else and that is: Never Give Up! That is probably the best advice I can give to writers even today. What format the BBC uses now in freelance contributions I don’t know but I think they do still accept material for their shows, you probably need to contact them first and check what they are looking for. I suspect that goes for all media too. 

Credit: Mistress of the Rock


How did your wife Niki play a role in introducing you to Cyprus, Greece? What was the unexpected discovery that inspired you to write your first book Mistress of the Rock?

My Wife is Greek Cypriot second generation, although she was born in London, her parents are Greek Cypriot a bit like me as both my parents were Welsh, but I was born in England. The role Niki played was for us to visit the famous landmark of Aphrodite’s Rock (Petra Tou Romiou) for lunch. So call it kismet or fate, we went for lunch in a restaurant overlooking the rock. Whilst we were there we talked about the legend of the Goddess of Love, which was a conversation that was mainly about me not believing in the myth or in the legend, doubting any veracity to the story. But something caught my attention, it was a poster on the wall, an aerial view of the rock produced by the Cypriot Tourist Board, which clearly showed an image of a woman under the sea. The irony is I have never been able to trace that poster again and even when I went back to the restaurant some months later it was nowhere to be seen. That was my epiphany moment and the beginning of the story. 

What was the epiphany that provided emotional and intellectual fuel for you to pen Mistress of the Rock and Scylla: The Revenge?

Seeing the image in the sea provided me with a plot line, but I knew I could not write the story unless I could live some of it. That is to say I needed to do more research and I needed to be closer to the location than I was in the UK. As it happens both of my kids were at an age where it would be possible to move them across to Cyprus because the education they were getting in the UK was not great. It would offer them a new life and at the same time give Niki and her Mum and sister more time to spend together, as both were living in Cyprus already. Once I settled in and got a job and a house I could look at the idea of the Mistress again. I wrote a screenplay first, showed it to some people who suggested I turn it into a book. I did this for a Christmas present for Niki, she read it, liked it and gave it to others to read. They said I should get it published. I contacted a local publisher in Nicosia who asked for a synopsis and then a manuscript, the following week he called me and asked me to go to his office. We published 5,000 copies in English and Greek. I think the encouragement I got from people convinced me to find a publisher. With Scylla the circumstances were much different, as my previous publisher had gone bust due to the Cypriot financial crisis. 

Credit: Scylla: The Revenge

Aphrodite's Rock is a famous landmark on the island of Cyprus. What are the few characteristics of this landmark that are only known by the locals?

Petra Tou Romiou or ‘The Rock of the Greek,’ has two legends the first of course is the birth of the ‘Goddess of Love, Aphrodite’ so beautifully captured in Botticelli’s masterpiece, where she is pictured emerging from a conk shell, although the background shows no trace of the rocks in the picture. The second, where the literal translation of ‘Rock of the Greek.’ refers to the Greek hero Digenis Akritas who defeated invading hordes by hurling a huge rock from the Troodos Mountains at them. By far it is the Aphrodite legend that attracts the tourists, not just for its sheer beauty and magnetism, being described as one of the most romantic places on the planet which may be an exaggeration but there is no doubting the sheer majesty of its sunsets against a backdrop of a spectrum of natural colours, utterly breathtaking and is no doubt why so many newlyweds come to the rocks to have their first wedding pictures together on ‘The Island of Love.’ 

Myron, your genre of writing is fact fiction. Can you please share an overview of this specific niche of writing?

There are seven basic plots to writing:
  • Overcoming the Monster.
  • Rags to Riches.
  • The Quest.
  • Voyage and Return.
  • Comedy.
  • Tragedy.
  • Rebirth. 
Mine doesn’t fit into any of these as fact fiction. Why because it is a fiction based on a fact and vice versa. The myth of Aphrodite is after all just a legend, but the rock in the water is a fact. Whether you believe it or not to be the image of the Goddess is entirely a personal choice, but there is no disputing that the rock is there. Hence fact, the fiction is in the story, and the blending of myth with reality. In particular the episodes where Richard Cole suffers with his PTSD, are also aligned to the plot of the story. I think this and again it’s my personal opinion that this story cuts through the basic plots and introduces a new perspective that of Fact Fiction novels. 

At what point in your writing process did you decide the story 'Mistress of the Rock' will unfold in the form of a trilogy?

Mistress of the Rock has evolved, first as a screenplay to test its merit, second as a one off book a gift for my Wife, thirdly as a published book. Each stage in this journey has taken me to the next level. Had there not been the crisis in Cyprus I am fairly confident that this would have become a film and it would probably have stopped there. That didn’t happen, so it fell upon me to progress the story. Purely by chance I was looking around on how to do this waiting for my contract to expire from my first publisher before approaching anyone else and during that time I read about a Cryptid (Sea Monster) which is said to inhabit the coasts around Ayia Napa beach resort, the locals call it “To Filiko Teras” the friendly monster. With the way book one ends, this gave me the opportunity to combine this legend with that of the Aphrodite one so as to be able to move the story forward. I took both books to my new publisher in the States, James Hill, and Proprietor of Rock Hill Publishing who produced both books. The way book two ends gave me the opportunity to do book 3 as the climax to the whole trilogy. 

What is the name of your latest Trilogy and what inspired it?

I have settled on the title Alpha and Omega The Return, it seems fitting as the Greek translation of Alpha and Omega means the beginning and the end. This third book is possibly the best of all, as first of all it is really about Julie, Richard Cole’s Wife. It is also written from her perspective. As a male I have never before written in the persona of a female, I have used female characters of course, but not as the central one. I hope I have got it right. What I am particularly pleased about is Julie’s transformation from suburban housewife to that of a heroine. I won’t say any more than that as I don’t want to give too much away. But I think it could even stand alone as a story with a few adjustments. 

Myron, tell us about your writing process. What has hosting over 40 years of writing experience taught you about your relationship with audiences among the field of radio, TV, advertising and writing books?

What a great question. Each topic that you mention has its own audience and therefore its own requirement. If the brief is to write one liners, you need to have at least twenty or more to show the producer, consistency as I mentioned before is essential with this type of comedy. Addressing the audience means understanding the product, which applies across all media. It is the same with advertising, knowing the product and its merits allows you to develop ideas and take those ideas into full blown campaigns which cut across all mediums. So if a product can be promoted on TV would it work as well on radio, or in print or on posters? Will it have the legs and be sustainable as a household name? Does it have a strap line that could become part of the language example “Have a break, have a Kit Kat.” In fact some of the most famous of all campaigns came just by chance. In the case of Kit Kat the agency had been working on the ad for days and couldn’t come up with something, until one writer said, “We have been doing this for hours, let’s take a break.” The rest is history. Book writing is a different science whereas script writing and advertising is time conscious. Books can be written over a period of time and require more detail, more research, this important time element gives you the opportunity to not only build your story and characters but also the chance to evaluate how this plays to your audience, you can also adapt your writing to a particular audience genre. 

What books and authors have impacted your writing career?

No one in particular has influenced me or my style of writing. I have tried to keep my own style in my books. Of the authors who I perhaps have followed one man and his books stand out as unique, that is the late George McDonald Fraser of the Flashman series of books, the way he writes and uses Flashman as a foil for his adventures is ingenious, as he takes the anti-hero of Tom Brown’s schooldays and turns him into the most loveable rogue who travels around the world seeking pleasures in all shapes and sizes, but the clever thing is he interweaves the story line with actual facts, putting Flashman in the heat of the action. Of course I enjoy the classics, Dickens, Oscar Wilde and Stoker, as well as more contemporary writers such as Stephen King, James Herbert and Peter Benchhley to name but a few. 

What is the best professional writing tip you've received in your career? In the past decade? From your friends and family?

In short never give up.

Myron, what activities do you entertain to relax when you're not writing?

I watch football, I have followed Tottenham Hotspur since 1961, and when this pandemic is over I will be going back to the Spurs Pub in Limassol to watch the games again. I also enjoy a game of pool, and of course spending time with the family. We are lucky we have a beach not too far away so in summer we go there.

If you could only choose one book as a reference guide for your life, which book would you choose and why?

In all honesty I would choose Mistress of the Rock, not just because I wrote it, but because it has lessons to offer, about love and jealousy, fear and terror, belief and passion, friendship and courage. That it is what I would choose, because it evokes all of these emotions in the ultimate test of true love. 

Please share with audiences how they can support your work.

Bookshops selling Mistress series 2021.

Mistress of the Rock @ Amazon
Scylla: The Revenge @ Amazon

Mistress of the Rock @ WHSmith
Scylla: The Revenge @ WHSmith

Mistress of the Rock @ Foyles
Scylla: The Revenge @ Foyles

Mistress of the Rock @ Bookshop
Scylla: The Revenge @ Bookshop

Mistress of the Rock @ Barnes and Noble
Scylla: The Revenge @ Barnes and Noble

All books are also available at Rock Hill Publishing.

February 09, 2021

Christine Handy Visits Moving Mountains

 Meet Christine Handy

Motivational Speaker, Model, Producer & Mother

Credit: Sasha Talks | Christine Handy

An accomplished model in both the national and international sphere, Christine began modeling at the tender age of 11 in her hometown of St. Louis, Missouri. Through her career, she has done campaigns for notable brands including Guess, J. Crew, JC Penney, Bud Light, Pepsi, Petco and Target. Modeling up until her cancer diagnosis, Christine now aims to serve as a spokesperson, speaker and Ambassador for cancer-related causes. Her story has been featured in many prestigious publications including American Volksport Association Magazine, Healing Touch, Town & Style, Edge Magazine, Inner Realm Magazine, The Art of Healing; Kindred Spirit Magazine, and Outreach Magazine. Christine has also been featured as a breast cancer advocate and expert on Fox News Radio. Christine has two amazing sons whose devotion through all her illnesses continues to humble and astound her. Christine’s family has been a rock, a comfort, and a blessing during hard times. In the immortal words of Princess Diana, “Family is the most important thing in the world.” (Credit: WCD Speakers)

Credit: Walk Beside Me

Credit: Christine Handy

#TuneIn
Christine discusses her latest updates, Willow The Film, her second book & more.

Moving Mountains SPOTLIGHT ** Author and Entrepreneurs Alexis & Justin Black **

Featured Post

Meet Megan Davis, Hollywood Actress and Producer

Credit: Actress Megan Davis Megan, Welcome! Your history traces back to acting from the early age of three years old working on commercials....